Research

I am a field researcher studying the relational nature of work. Organizations are inherently social institutions and provide myriad opportunities for relationship formation. My work begins with the simple insight that all relationships are not equal: interpersonal relationships can vary in nature from purely instrumental to characterized by affective concern–such as friendships or romantic partnerships. My research is grounded in the idea that organizational contexts have a meaningful impact on the nature of relationships we form within those contexts. Processes, structures or expressed values can, for example, facilitate deep interpersonal belongingness relationships, or can hamper employees’ ability to forge these deep, meaningful relationships.

My work explores the ways in which varying relational experiences, as facilitated by contextual factors, lead to, or inhibit, important indivdiual and organizational outcomes such as engagement, fulfillment, motivation and performance, and individual development. My exploration is primarily field-based, and is largely quantitative in nature. I leverage field experiments, quantitative analyses of archival data, and social network analysis in answering my research questions. I have conducted research across various industries–including food processing; fruit harvesting; auto manufacturing; fast food; and consulting. I have a particular interest in blue-collar occupations, and am passionate about exploring the ways in which relationships at work can make routine work more meaningful.

My research falls loosely into three general categories.

Relational Motivation & Need Expectations

My current research in this area explores the ways in which the nature of relational interactions at work facilitate, or supress, important individual and organizational outcomes such as motivation, engagement and personal well-being.  Much of my work in this domain emanates from a theory of relational need expectations, suggesting that employee engagement varies as a function of their expectations of need fulfillment at work.  Expectations of belongingness and authentic self-expression in the workplace serve as a double-edged sword: these heightened expectations can, if validated through interpersonal interactions at work, yield extremely positive levels of work engagement.  But heightened expectations, if invalidated through intepersonal experiences, can yield particularly extreme levels of disengagement.

My empirical work in this domain leverages field experiments and longitudinal surveys showing, for example, that interpersonal interactions at work that facilitate an enhanced sense of belongingness can, in routine and low-significance jobs (such as fruit harvesting), yield heightened motivation, and increase productivity and performance.

Personal Development & Interpersonal Feedback

Enabling individual development and learning are key to enabling organizational success as well as employee satisfaction and engagement.  Many organizational approaches to employee development visualize feedback processes as mechanisms for illuminating individual development needs–a means of overcoming poor self-awareness.  This line of study is grounded in the notion that interpersonal feedback is an exercise in information transfer.

My work in this domain embraces an alternate view of feedback and personal development, recognizing that these interpersonal processes are also stylized relational interactions.  My work illlustrates the ways in which interpersonal feedback can trigger the reforming of social networks as recipients seek to cultivate a more hospitable relational clime.  My work also explores the ways in which the developmental nature of feedback is shaped by relational assessments and attributions.  More recent work in this domain leverages both qualitative and quantitative insights from the field to examine the relational mechanisms that enable indivdual career growth.

Self-Management and Self-Organizing Systems

Self-management serves as a foundational theme for much of my research; many of my interests were forged while working to enable self-management in organizational settings.  Self-managing systems rely heavily on interpersonal relationships, peer regulation and feedback, and strong social ties.  My research, viewed broadly, provides insights on which non-hierarchical, self-organizing systems, can be built.

Research, Writing & Academic Presentations

    • Green, Jr., P., Gino, F., and Staats, B.  Shopping for Confirmation: How Threatening Feedback Leads People to Reshape Their Social Network.  
    • Gino, F., Green, Jr., P. and Ariely, D.  Not That Human: When and Why We De-Humanize Others.  
    • Frey, E., Green, Jr., P., Kouchaki, M., Margolis, J., and Gino, F.  Speaking With Different Voices: Feedback Changes Based on Perceptions of Recipients’ Morality.  Status: lab study data collection and manuscript preparation for submission to Administrative Science Quarterly
    • Green, Jr., P., Finkel, E., Fitzsimmons, G., and Gino, F.  Relational Need Expectations and The Changing Nature of Work Engagement.  Status: in preparation 
    • Green, Jr., P.  and Gino, F. The Social Facilitation of Effective Feedback: How Feedback Giver Mindset Leads to Feedback that is Listened To.  Status: Data analysis

    • Green, Jr., P., Gino, F., and Cable, D.   Becoming Just a Number: The Longitudinal Suffocation of Engagement.  Status: Data Collection
    • Green, Jr., P.  Facilitating Belongingness: The Spillover Effects of Listening Leaders.  Status: Data collection

    • Casciaro, T., Gino, F., Green, Jr., PCuriosity and Network Formation.  Status: Data Collection

    • Steiner, J., Green, Jr., P., Staats, B., Gino, F.  Difficult Conversations: Why and How Employees Engage in Peer-regulatory Behavior.  Status: Data collection

    • Green, Jr., P., Gino, F., and Staats, B. R. (May 2017)  Seeking to Belong: How the Words of Internal and External Beneficiaries Influence Performance.  Paper presented at the Positive Organizational Scholarship Research Conference, Ann Arbor, MI.  Presenter

    • Green, Jr., P., Gino, F., and Staats, B. R. (November 2016)  Shopping for Confirmation: How Negative Feedback Shapes Social Networks.  Poster presented at the Society for Judgment and Decision Making annual conference, Boston, MA.  

    • Green, Jr., P., Gino, F., and Staats, B. R. (August 2016)  Shopping for Confirmation: How Negative Feedback Shapes Social Networks.  Paper presented at the Academy of Management annual meeting, Anaheim, CA.  Presenter. *Selected as a “Showcase Symposium” 
    • Green, Jr., P., Gino, F., and Staats, B. R. (April 2016)  Shopping for Confirmation: How Negative Feedback Shapes Social Networks.  Paper presented at the NYU-Columbia Doctoral Student Conference, New York, NY.  Presenter.
    • Green, Jr., P., Gino, F., and Staats, B. R. (2015) Finding Meaning in Seemingly Meaningless Work: How the Words of Internal and External Beneficiaries Influence Performance.  Paper presented at the Columbia-NYU Doctoral Student Conference, New York, NY.  Presenter.
    • Agarwal, R., Allison, J., Brook, Y., Green, Jr., P., Barney, J., Kirkpatrick, D., Klein, P., Locke, E., Sullivan, J., Teegen, H., and Tesluk, P. (2013).  Myths and Realities of Capitalism: Micro and Macro Perspectives.  Professional Development Workshop at Academy of Management annual meeting, Orlando, FL.  Speaker.
    • Tesluk, P., and Green, Jr., P. (2011).  Bridging the Divide: Doing Research that Impacts Practice and Building Effective Partnerships.  Professional Development Workshop at Academy of Management annual meeting, San Antonio, TX.  Co-chair and Presenter
    • Campbell-Bush, E., Farh, C., Chen, G., Tesluk, P., and Green, Jr., P., (2011). Holding Peers Accountable: Antecedents of Peer Regulation Behaviors in Self-Managed Collectives.  Paper presented at Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology annual meeting, Chicago, IL.
    • Green, Jr., P., Ziegert, J., Resick, C.J., and Ma, D., (2011).  Social Capital and Performance Ratings: Examining Rater and Ratee Effects.  Poster presented at Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology annual meeting, Chicago, IL.
    • Resick, C.J., Ziegert, J., Ma, D., and Green, Jr., P. (2010).  Person-Organization Congruence and Network Position: A Social Capital Perspective.  Paper presented at Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology annual conference, Atlanta, GA.
    • Resick, C.J., Ziegert, J., Ma, D., and Green, Jr., P. (2010).  Person-Organization Fit and Social Network Centrality.  Paper presented at International Network for Social Network Analysis annual Sunbelt Social Networks Conference, Riva del Garda, TN, Italy.
    • Green, Jr., P. (2011).  “Self-Management and the Holy Grail.” Synaptein, pg. 5-6
    • Green, Jr., P. (2011).  “The Colleague Letter of Understanding: Replacing Jobs With Commitments.”  The Management Innovation Exchange Online (www.managementexchange.com)
    • Green, Jr., P. (2010).  “The Organizational Model of the Future.”  Synaptein

     

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